• 5315 N. Clark St. • Suite 611 • Chicago, IL • 60640
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Date/Time
01/21/21
5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

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Yin Sotai with Bob Quinn, DAOM, LAC
2 CEU (pending) available for current OAA members

This class will focus on teaching the basic skills to give a Yin Sotai treatment. Yin Sotai is an evolution of Sotai, a system developed in the last century by Keizo Hashimoto, MD as the culmination of his study in numerous traditional manual arts. Yin Sotai continues his work in an even gentler form but holds to all the principles he laid out. Yin Sotai, like regular Sotai, is best thought of as a system of neuromuscular reeducation.

In Yin Sotai always movements are given to both sides of the body. For example, the supine patient might be asked to gently dorsiflex the right ankle, while at the same time flexing the left hip. This is done for a few reasons, the most important of which is that it forces the patient to engage the core pelvic stabilizing muscles in a novel way. This lumbo-pelvic center is referred to in Japanese culture as koshi. Dr. Hashimoto himself emphasized the importance of koshi engagement. In this way the very gentle movements of Yin Sotai are often enough to bring significant pain relief to a patient.

Objectives

Participants will learn the basic principles of Yin Sotai (and by extension Sotai)
Participants will be able to explain why gentle systems, such as Yin Sotai, are often a better match for certain kinds of patients.
Participants will learn the six “listening posts” of Yin Sotai.
Participants will be able to explain why a whole-body approach to conditions of pain is generally more effective than simply placing local needles.
Participants will learn a rationale for working gently.

 

Bob Quinn has pursued a path that differs from that of most Chinese Medicine practitioners in the U.S. He has studied and practiced a neoclassical style of acupuncture whose roots are more Japanese than Chinese, although the same core Chinese classical texts are studied for insights. This style, referred to as Japanese Meridian Therapy, utilizes very gentle techniques. The acupuncture needles are far thinner and are inserted typically only very superficially; often they are not even inserted at all.
Dr. Quinn earned his master’s and doctoral degrees in Chinese Medicine in 1998 and 2008 respectively. His doctoral capstone project was on the topic of “Wholeness in Traditional East Asian Medicine.” Dr. Quinn has also worked in recent years to bring the practice of dream work back into Chinese Medicine. (Two chapters in the Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine deal with dreams, but it is not at all common for practitioners to use patients’ dream images in any significant way.)

In his clinical practice at NUNM and in his private SE Portland clinic, Dr. Quinn treats a variety of conditions, ranging from musculoskeletal pain to anxiety to chronic conditions, including Lyme disease. A writer as well, Dr. Quinn has contributed articles, case studies, book reviews, and interviews to professional publications such as the North American Journal of Oriental Medicine and The Journal of Chinese Medicine, along with monthly columns in community papers for the public.

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Bookings

Registrations are closed for this event.

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Date/Time
01/21/21
5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Categories No Categories


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Address

Oregon Association of Acupuncturists
c/o TBC
12707 NE Halsey St.
Portland, OR 97230

Bookings

Registrations are closed for this event.